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Applying best practices of management to recognition success

Employee recognition and rewards programs come with vast potential to excel in the marketplace, as more engaged and productive staff members will tend to yield a wealth of competitive advantages regardless of which industry one might be discussing.

Employee recognition and rewards programs come with vast potential to excel in the marketplace, as more engaged and productive staff members will tend to yield a wealth of competitive advantages regardless of which industry one might be discussing. However, despite the fact that these initiatives would appear to be extremely straightforward and intuitive, many companies fail to strike the right chord either at the outset of deployment or somewhere down the line. 

One of the reasons behind these struggles is a bit more systematic than some would believe, in that the culture of the business will often dictate the success or failure of a recognition program. For example, when a business does not have good communication across the board, nor do managers and other leaders keep up with the goings-on among ground-level employees, identifying preferences and touching upon them in practice will be far more difficult. 

"When managers are not setting good examples for others to follow. the likelihood of seeing optimal outcomes goes down significantly."

Although the best recognition programs will generally be robust in the sense of widespread involvement among all employees, it goes without saying that leaders need to be the ones taking on the brunt of the workload for these initiatives. When managers are not setting good examples for others to follow in the employee recognition arena, the likelihood of seeing optimal outcomes goes down significantly, and this can all be avoided with a little more awareness. 

Leadership 101
Forbes recently listed some of the ways in which it would define a strong leader, especially through the eyes of common employees, affirming that these individuals are centrally important to virtually all operational performances. Not to say that a trickle-down approach to corporate management will always be effective, but in the world of employee engagement and relevant recognition programs, organizations will do well to start their efforts off with robust leadership enablement. 

One of the first characteristics of a strong leader is the ability to empower other employees.

According to the news provider, one of the first characteristics of a strong leader is the ability to empower other employees, giving them freedom to try new things and confidence that they are working to the benefit of the business. This ties back into recognition in an interesting fashion, as leaders who can strike the right chord in this respect will likely be giving employees a powerful sense of recognition, as it is a sign of respect and trust that will push them to new heights of performance. 

The source also explained that accountability, honesty, respect, clarity and authenticity are critical personality components that must be prevalent for a leader to succeed in any of his or her endeavors, especially with the preferences that are so popular among the modern workforce. Likewise, when trying to boost employee engagement through a recognition program, a lack of authenticity and accountability – not to mention consistency – can actually have a negative impact rather than the desired objectives. 

"Employee investments can have a profoundly positive impact on financial and operational performances."

Organizational effort
The News Observer recently explained that employee investments can have a profoundly positive impact on financial and operational performances from the ground up, as employees will quickly recognize the ways in which their employers are valuing them. This is similar to the benefits of having strong leaders at the helm of employee engagement programs, in that staff members need to see the authentic and sincere efforts their employers are putting forth to truly be benefited by these types of programs. 

In the realm of employee recognition and rewards programs, companies must work to align each investment with a specific staff preference or corporate objective, while having steadfast commitments to exceptional leadership and organizational enablement can help to achieve higher performances in this respect. 

Ever wonder about the myths of recognition programs? Click here to download our white paper.

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