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Optimal employee engagement programs demand simplicity

Sometimes companies do a little too much, and even when their intentions are good, creating complexities can quickly hinder employee recognition and rewards program success.

Sometimes companies do a little too much, and even when their intentions are good, creating complexities can quickly hinder employee recognition and rewards program success. Simplicity and a common-sense approach to these initiatives will often pay back dividends when looking at the long-term financial and operational benefits involved, but this is not to say that the programs do not demand progressive thinking. 

Rather, there should be plenty of research, planning and training that goes into the deployment of these programs, and business leaders should work to keep matters as simple as possible to get the job done right over time. When in doubt, leveraging a professional service provider can separate the winners from the losers in employee engagement investments, while leaders should always recognize when they need support of any kind. 

Simplicity is king
Business 2 Community recently affirmed that businesses should work to keep employee recognition programs a bit informal, as this approach has been found to hit the preferences of more staff members than an overly stringent or formal initiative. According to the news provider, this can have significantly positive impacts on the overall performance of employees and businesses, as one study revealed that recognition can boost engagement by as much as 60 percent.

Not surprisingly, this type of advantage snowballs into countless others, including a lower rate of turnover and higher productivity, while the source noted that too many companies are simply not putting forth any type of initiative to enjoy these greener pastures. Citing another piece of research, Business 2 Community pointed out that nearly three-quarters of employees are either not getting any type of recognition, or only receive it once a year, which is not really enough to make any type of tangible difference.

Finally, the news provider suggested companies give praise to as many employees as possible and maintain an adequate balance across the board.  

What makes for good recognition?
One of the key tenets of recognition is the act of getting more than just one type of employee involved, meaning that these initiatives should work to stimulate praise coming from a wide variety of individuals. Combining managerial and peer recognition can be a simple pursuit that comes with significant benefits to the business. 

Ever wonder what the myths and facts of recognition programs entail? Click here to download our white paper.

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