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Where Customer, Employee Engagement Meet

The fight to bolster employee morale and engagement has moved ahead at full steam over the past decade, especially as companies begin to become a bit more capable of measuring the returns on investment associated with these strategies.

The fight to bolster employee morale and engagement has moved ahead at full steam over the past decade, especially as companies begin to become a bit more capable of measuring the returns on investment associated with these strategies. Additionally, the impending talent gap that so many experts have forecast seems to be motivating employers to get more serious about their engagement, recognition and rewards programs to keep staff members around longer. 

There is no denying that an engaged workforce is essentially the best characteristic a company can hope to achieve, as productivity and efficiency, along with collaboration and innovation, have been found to spike in these environments, helping the business continuously improve over time. On the other side of that coin, though, a staff that is not engaged can quickly lead to significant challenges in practice, namely with the high indirect and direct costs of employee churn. 

The time is now to get moving on more robust strategies that are specifically targeted at maximizing employee engagement, and there are plenty of options to improve matters in these areas, namely those offered by reliable and experience professional service providers. Remember, investing in outsourced support for employee recognition and rewards programs can be more affordable and financially beneficial than trying to do it all in-house without the proper tools on hand. 

Why so serious?
Catherine Clifford, writing for Entrepreneur Magazine, recently explained some of the ways in which companies commonly fail at engagement strategies, asserting that a lack of fun and light-heartedness can lead to the exact opposite results of what was desired. Now, when executives and boardroom members are trying to map out investment strategies and find ways to bolster the bottom line, fun is not normally a word that would enter the conversation. 

However, engagement is a bit different than most other investment strategies – both for employees and clientele – and does in fact demand some level of gamification to truly work. According to the author, some businesses have found success in making their core compliance training and other weighty learning sessions more engaging through gamification, leading to stronger results than seen with less colorful pursuits. 

Clifford pointed out that 70 percent of the 200 largest enterprises are expected to have at least one form of gamification in place within the next five months, further indicating that this method is pretty consistent in driving preferable outcomes. Leaders should put themselves in the shoes of their employees and try to understand, objectively, whether or not the programs in place will actually succeed in boosting engagement. 

In many instances, gamification is the only component that needs to be added on to take a good initiative and transform it into an exceptional one, and the proof is in the pudding. Clifford affirmed that while 87 percent of employees are not engaged at work, studies have found that gamification can boost engagement by as much as 60 percent. 

There are no easy fixes in business, but this one is certainly close. 

Tying in to clientele
It is pretty simple: An engaged and productive workforce will almost always yield happier clientele, a stronger brand image and more consistent sales performances, along with continuous improvements to the bottom line. The trick is to first understand that employee engagement strategies that involve robust recognition and rewards initiatives should be developed in an entirely staff-centric fashion to begin reaping the benefits on the client side. 

This often takes a comprehensive effort to improve as an organization, and knowledge of what works and what does not. 

Ever wonder what the myths of employee recognition are? Click here to download our white paper.

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