X

Would you like to customize your experience?

We will only send you the content you are most interested in.

I'm interested in:

Not now, thanks.

Stay Up-to-date with Xceleration

For employees, there’s a difference between being ‘recognized’ and being ‘valued’

When creating an employee rewards program, businesses adopt strategies that aim to motivate staff members as well as demonstrate to them that their hard work is valued and recognized.

When creating an employee rewards program, businesses adopt strategies that aim to motivate staff members as well as demonstrate to them that their hard work is valued and recognized.

However, new research from Kenexa found that there is a qualitative difference between "feeling valued" and "receiving recognition" for work among employees. In fact, while the statement "I receive recognition when I do good work" was 55 percent favorable, the phrase "I feel valued as an employee of this company" was only 41 percent favorable.

The research interprets the divergence between the two statements' favorability ratings as an indication of how recognition connotes acknowledging people for tasks performed exceptionally well while valuing someone relates to the worth an employee brings to a company merely by being a part of it.

For businesses, these findings offer a key lesson: While it's important to value your employees, it may not be enough. Staff members need to be recognized for their contributions and efforts rather than their mere presence.

To accomplish this, many firms are turning to employee incentive programs, which allow supervisors to reward workers who have gone above and beyond.

What are you waiting for?
Subscribe to get the latest from our blog!